Good Food Journey

Good Food Journey

Our Good Food Plan has been developed in collaboration between David Jones’ sustainability and food teams, to reflect the importance of our Good Business Journey to our growing food business.


The plan covers a broad range of food sustainability issues including labour standards, sustainable raw materials, packaging, energy and water use, animal welfare and sustainable seafood.

For each issue identified, our Good Food Plan provides guidance to our teams about the sustainability considerations along our supply chain and for our customers; establishes specific commitments and targets; and outlines the actions we will take in progressing towards these objectives, together.

We will report on the progress of our Good Food Plan at least annually. Solid progress has been made on a number of initiatives over the first year of our plan, establishing a strong foundation for next year and beyond.

What are the issues?

Human rights in supply chains remains an important and high-profile issue, with instances of poor working conditions along the supply chain continuing to be reported globally. Australian-based food supply chains are not immune, particularly in relation to temporary labour on local farms and in food processing facilities.

What is our response?

All direct vendors supplying to David Jones’ food business have now signed up to our Supplier Code of Conduct and provide information to us to help our due diligence, as part our Ethical Sourcing program. In addition, David Jones is working towards full traceability (from farm-to-fork) on all raw materials used in food products trading under the David Jones brand. We will work actively with producers to understand the extent to which temporary labour is used and ensure that workers employed through brokers are not denied access to decent pay and conditions. David Jones is also monitoring the development of industry certification and licensing schemes for temporary labour providers and will adopt one of these schemes, once it is practical to do so.

What are the issues?

Sustainable farming is a broad theme covering a range of farming issues including water availability and usage, energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, soil health and management, land scarcity, weather patterns and crop yields, and engagement measures to secure the next generation of farmers.

What is our response?

To date, the team has conducted extensive research on sustainable farming in Australia to understand the issues experienced by farmers and the sector. This research, along with industry engagement of key stakeholders (also underway) will inform the development of our sustainable farming strategy, which we plan to publish in FY2018.

What are the issues?

Overfishing and irresponsible fishing methods cause the depletion of fish stocks, which has already placed a number of species at risk.

What is our response?

In consultation with industry experts, we will develop our sustainable seafood principles through FY2018. These principles will confirm our preference for Australian seafood from sustainable sources and will inform our purchasing decisions. We will also set targets for adoption of these principles and report annually on our progress.

What are the issues?

Sourcing of raw materials used for food production has been linked to a wide range of social and environmental impacts including high water use, deforestation, adverse impacts on animal habitats and communities, and poor working conditions including child labour.

What is our response?

By FY2020, David Jones will adopt responsible sourcing strategies for all key raw materials including palm oil, cocoa, sugar and soy. To date we have developed our Sustainable Cocoa Position Statement. This commits us to using sustainable cocoa and chocolate products trading under the David Jones brand. As of mid-2017 we have achieved already this goal on most of our private label range including all David jones brand confectionary.

What are the issues?

It is estimated that the average Australian creates 200kg of packaging waste each year and that 65% of that waste is food packaging. Over packaging of products creates significant environmental impacts, particularly on our oceans and natural habitats. The ability to recycle packaging at the end of its life is an important consideration, as is the role of packaging in minimising food waste.

What is our response?

David Jones is committed to improving the design of packaging, to reduce environmental and social impacts without compromising product integrity or safety. To meet this commitment, we have started to develop sustainable design guidelines for packaging and we will support our team in the implementation of these standards through FY2018. To support curbside recycling, we have also developed an on-pack recycling label system, modelled on Planet Ark’s Australian Recycling Label.

What are the issues?

David Jones recognises the need to ensure the highest level of animal welfare in terms of the conditions in which animals are housed, farmed and slaughtered.

What is our response?

All of our suppliers are bound by the animal welfare clause set out in our Supplier Code of Conduct. In addition, our private label suppliers are also bound by our more onerous Animal Welfare Policy. Going forward, David Jones will develop technical product-based standards for animal welfare by FY2020. These standards will include targets for poultry, meat, eggs, dairy and farmed fish, to help ensure our standards are being met across the supply chain. We can already assure our customers that all of our fresh hen eggs are free range as well as all eggs in David Jones brands ice cream, prepared meals, salads and sandwiches and all menus developed for our food service counters. We can also assure them that all chicken, turkey and pork is either certified free-range or RSPCA approved, beef is grass fed and hormone free, and lamb is grass fed on the meat counter, fresh-packed and in prepared meals under the David Jones brand.

What are the issues?

The Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) of the United Nations estimates that about one third of global food production is wasted each year. When edible food is thrown away, resources invested in the production, processing, packaging and distribution of that food are all wasted, not to mention the social impact. Once disposed, food waste in landfill is a significant cause of methane, which traps more heat in the atmosphere than carbon dioxide.

What is our response?

In order to avoid sending food waste to landfill, we will partner with charity partners to donate excess food stock before it expires. We will also work with our waste contractors and landlords to find alternative solutions that divert food waste away from landfill and convert food into energy. We are also looking at on-site food processing solutions, such as dehydrators or anaerobic digestors.

What are the issues?

According to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, 64.6% adults were considered obese in 2014-15, which is up from 56.3% in 1995. Excess weight, especially obesity, is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, musculoskeletal conditions and cancer.

What is our response?

Recognising the role we can play in the good health and wellbeing of our customers, we are currently developing a health and nutrition strategy, which will be released in FY2018. This strategy will be informed by industry engagement and consultation, and a review of the approaches adopted by best practice retailers. As part of our health and nutrition strategy we will aim to make it easier for customers to choose healthy food options through clear on-pack labelling and nutritional information. We have already started to develop on-pack labeling for a range of products that contain no artificial flavours, no artificial colours and no added preservatives. We have also started to incorporate the Health Star Rating system onto our packaging.